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Dounreay security expert wins global award

May 17, 2010

Malcolm Clark (left), who won the top award from the World Institute of Nuclear Security

A security expert at Dounreay has been honoured for his contribution to ways to improve the security of nuclear material around the world.

Malcolm Clark took the top award in a contest organised by the World Institute of Nuclear Security.

Its essay competition was open to almost 300 organisations in 48 countries.

His paper took the top prize of 1000 Euros and earned Malcolm an invitation to speak at a special security summit being held as part of the 2010 IAEA general conference in Vienna in September.

“I was absolutely delighted when I heard,” said Malcolm.

“Keeping nuclear material safe and secure has always been an important aspect of the industry but its global significance has taken on new dimensions in the current climate of international security, so I was really pleased that WINS thought my contribution worthy of their top award.”

Malcolm’s security career began in 1977 when he joined the RAF police. He’s worked in the UK and abroad in counter intelligence, counter-terrorism and counter-sabotage during a career that included a spell at AWE Aldermaston before joining Dounreay in 2001.

He is involved in all aspects of Dounreay’s security in his current role as deputy site security manager with DSRL, with a particular focus on physical security.

His essay, entitled Security is More than Onions, explored aspects of nuclear security beyond the conventional wisdom of defence-in-depth usually illustrated by the layers of an onion.

It identified practical ways to raise standards in the professional nuclear security industry worldwide through greater collaboration and sharing of information between members of the World Institute of Nuclear Security.

WINS was founded in September 2008 during the general conference of the IAEA and is supported financially by the governments of Canada, USA and Norway as part of the global Nuclear Threat Initiative.

 

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